Author Archives: Sophie Cooke

Boho & Rustic Latvian Wedding Inspired By Ancient Pagan Culture

When asked how they met, Laura and Girts always joke that they met on the internet, but really that’s just the beginning of their story. Girts had placed an advertisement on a local musicians page, looking for a rock band to join as a guitar player. Laura saw this and asked him why he would want to join an existing one, why don’t they start a new one instead. “Soon after that a few more musicians joined our crew, besides me, the drummer and Girts – the lead guitar player,” Laura told us. “Very soon something more than just a friendship developed between me and him. The band unfortunately didn’t last, but both our love story and friendship with fellow musicians did.” A decade later and the couple find themselves celebrating their wedding online, which is a nice full circle of events.

The couple planned the two-day celebration themselves, taking inspiration from ancient Latvian pagan culture and infusing it with boho and rustic aesthetics to match their personal style. Laura wore a Katya Katya London dress with Lilimill boots and a flower crown by Marta Egle, who also provided the bouquet and decor flowers. They spent €15,000 with most of their budget allocated to catering and location.

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Iridescent Realness: A Super Pink & Sparkly Wedding with BTTF, Harry Potter and Idles References!

Lois and Luke’s love of alternative culture and a desire to stand out from the crowd meant that they had plenty of different ideas to work with for their July wedding day. “I always thought we would have an all out themed wedding,” Lois told us, “but as we have so many interests we couldn’t settle on just one so we decided to incorporate some elements from each.” 

They started with sparkly and iridescent as a colour scheme, mixed with pink to match Luke’s shoes and tie. They then took things from some of their favourite interests; like a Lord of the Rings ring box, a Harry Potter sign, Beatles pocket watch and a matching badge that they both wore to represent their favourite band, IDLES. And that’s how you come up with a wedding theme that’s completely unique to you! 

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Let Love Sparkle: French Laundromat Disco Wedding Inspiration

At Rock n Roll Bride, we’re firm believers in finding beauty in the every day, but finding beauty in a laundromat might be a first even for us! Bare with us though, as you’ll see from the images that with the right styling, literally anywhere can be a vibe when you throw enough rock n roll at it.

Together with photographer Anne Letournel, Matthieu from Marions Nous Dans Les Bois wild wedding films wanted to create some original wedding inspiration, choosing a vintage laundromat in Rennes, Brittany as their location; a place with an authentic atmosphere that perfectly juxtaposed their disco theme for a completely crazy wedding.

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Rustic, DIY Backyard Wedding

Shannon and Emma were supposed to be married in Hawaii, but when COVID scuppered their plans not once but twice, they decided to change tact and organised a backyard DIY wedding instead. Armed with lots of inspiration from Instagram and Pinterest, they organised the whole thing over about 6 months, and spent just £3,500. 

“Covid really scuppered our original plans but we managed to pull of a beautiful, unique wedding with our closest loved ones anyway,” the brides told us. “It made us realise that you don’t have to spend a lot of money to have a beautiful wedding.”

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Rustic, Celtic Inspired Italian Woodland Wedding

For their May wedding day, highschool sweethearts Lorenzo and Erica wanted to celebrate their love in nature, surrounded by their closest friends and family. “In Italy, there really isn’t much outside of the norm for weddings,” Erica told us. “Even if they’re not religious, most people get married in a church for traditions’ sake, which didn’t suit us at all.”

Their wedding theme was very much inspired by Celtic traditions instead of religious ones. From celebrating everything in nature to hand fasting, jumping the broom and drinking hydromel from a shared chalice, the couple based their choices on keeping everything as simple as possible, but with an eye to celebrating the beautiful, too. They paired blue, bordeaux and blush for an ethereal colour palette and used apples as a symbol throughout – writing Norse Gods’ names on them for table names and choosing crockery with apple motifs. 

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I Do … & I Don’t: A Feminist’s Guide to Being a Bride – The Origins of Bridal Traditions

Our real bride columnist Rachel got married in September this year. We’re following her journey of planning a feminist meets rock n roll wedding, culminating in us sharing the big day in our last issue of the year! This month she’s been thinking about wedding
traditions.

I thought I had a handle on the major bridal traditions and the gripes many of us have with them. Lots of you reading this may have already decided to scratch out the word ‘obey’ from your vows, for example. A lot of modern brides also wrinkle their noses at the idea of ‘being given away’ and what that actually used to mean (that the literal ownership of the bride was changing hands from father to husband). Many have even come to believe that the first dance is tired and unnecessary. Not me, though – it’s my one chance to feel like I’m on Strictly Come Dancing. But I get it. It’s not for everyone.

It turns out I had no idea about the murky origins of so many staple wedding moments. For instance, did you know that the garter removal — that moment where the groom takes off the bride’s garter with his teeth, in front of his nephews, his grandma Joyce and his new father-in-law (I’ve seen it happen from many a stage as a wedding singer and it is never anything other than excruciating, please don’t do it) is the very distant descendant of a medieval tradition that would happen at the end of the wedding feast? Right before bedtime, someone would shout, ‘GET HER!’ and the congregation would launch upon the virgin bride, ripping off pieces of her dress to help unclothe her before the naked part of the nuptials. The bigger the chunk of dress you took home, the better the luck apparently. It’s worth nothing that this gang-undressing is also considered by many to be the great, great, great grandparent of catching the bouquet, as it’s in the same family of ‘taking home a piece of the bride for luck’.

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