Tag Archives: Japan

1980s Americana meets David LaChapelle Inspired Japanese Pre-Wedding Shoot

In Japan, it is traditional for couples to have a set of formal pre-wedding photos where the couple will wear their wedding attire and pose for formal pictures. “They are different from engagement shoots in the West,” photographer Mao told us, “as they’re still quite uptight and traditional. My concept is to shoot these in a fun way that convey the couples’ personalities and to make the day of the shoot as memorable as the wedding day itself.”

Ryo and Peco were the perfect couple to take on the challenge – Ryo bought a book by David LaChapelle to their first meeting so Mao knew they’d be open to creativity! “The groom is very into bright colours and has a unique sense of style, so I wanted to bring this out with a little twist to convey an more softer, bridal version of his idea. The final result came out as a pastel mix of unicorns and rainbows.”

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Honeymoon Travel Guide: Hiroshima

For most people, only one thing springs to mind when they hear the name ‘Hiroshima’. As the first ever city to suffer a nuclear attack, it has a sad history for sure, but today’s Hiroshima is far from a depressing place.

I had no idea what to expect when we hopped on the 90 minute train from Osaka, but what greeted us was a lively city with some of the friendliest people (and wildlife!) ever. They also have great food (make sure you try Okinomiyaki, a local speciality which is a fried cabbage, egg, meat and noodle dish) and fantastic scenery. We spent 48 hours here at the end of our time in Japan.

Here’s how we filled it:

The Atomic Bomb Dome and Peace Memorial

Our first stop was the Atomic Bomb Dome, one of very few structures left standing after the nuclear attack. The iconic ruin is a natural place to start your visit as from here you can walk down the river to the Peace Memorial Park and museum.

This was an emotional morning, especially because we’d both completely fallen in love with Japan and the people who live here. Just the thought of what it must have been like during the aftermath of the bombing is unfathomable.

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Honeymoon Travel Guide: Kyoto and Osaka

One of the things I was most looking forward to on our recent trip to Japan was that we were going to take the Shinkansen (bullet train) to a few different cities. The transport in Japan is so fast and reliable and it really wasn’t as scary as I thought it would be. (I wrote about our itinerary and all the ins and outs of getting the bullet train in my Japan 101 article.)

After Tokyo, the next city on our tour was Kyoto which is less than a three hour journey away. We opted to spend five nights, and although it was beautiful and peaceful, any longer and I think we would have struggled to fill our time. I must prefer to be busy and occupied when I travel. I’m terrible, I know, I literally do not know how to switch off!

There are way more people in traditional clothing in Kyoto which was so cool to see. These colours!

If you enjoy history, castles, palaces, gardens and museums, you’re going to LOVE it in Kyoto.

Castles and shrines

Being an older city there are plenty of castles (many of which have been converted into museums) for you to explore. Doing touristy things really isn’t my idea of a brilliant time, but Gareth particularly enjoyed our visits to Nijo Castle, the Silver Pavillion and Osaka Castle (which is in Osaka, obviously! More on that below). The Golden Pavilion, which unlike its silver counterpart is actually covered in gold, was also on our list, but we were feeling a bit Pavilion-ed out by the time we came to visit so we gave it a miss.

There are also SO MANY shrines in Kyoto. It’s hardly surprising that the city’s nickname is ‘the city of ten thousand shrines’! I’m pretty sure that’s literal too. Nearly every corner you turn its like “Oh hey, there’s another one!”

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Honeymoon Travel Guide: Tokyo

The movie Bright Lights, Big City may be about New York, but I think the concept is much more suited to Tokyo. I’ve been very lucky to have travelled a lot over the past few years, every time falling in love with new places, but nowhere has my heart quite like Japan’s capital.

I am 100% a city girl. I love the hustle and bustle, that fact that everything’s open super late, and that you never know who you might meet or what whirlwind adventure you might end up on next. However Tokyo is unlike any other city I’ve ever been because of one major thing – the people.

I don’t think I can adequately express just how much I adore the Japanese. Although Tokyo is one of the busiest places on the planet (with a population of THIRTEEN MILLION), unlike other big cities, it never feels rushed. People just don’t hurry like they do in New York, they’re not rude like they can be in London, and they don’t push and shove you as they cram onto the subway (and we went on it during rush hour! There were white-gloved attendants stuffing people on to the train and everything!) Yes, its hectic, but I never felt uncomfortably claustrophobic like I can do in London… maybe it’s because I’m easily a foot taller than everyone else there? HA!

People say “please”, “thank you very much” and “excuse me” all the time. They smile, they nod, they offer to help you with your bags down the steps. Even at Shibuya Crossing, the busiest cross-walk on the planet, the sea of people felt almost calming, not intimidating. I really don’t think I can explain how much I love this place to you properly unless you just go! I really hope you will too because there is literally no place else like it.

OK, OK, enough gushing! What I really want to share with you today is some fun things to do in Tokyo. As I mentioned in last week’s post, we were only there for two days this time (sob) and we’d been there before so we did most of the major touristy things that time. You definitely have to visit Odaiba Island, Tsukiji fish market, Tokyo Tower, the Imperial Palace, the ancient Sensō-ji Temple and Ueno Park. You should also try to take part in a traditional tea ceremony or a cooking or origami class if you can. But if you’re looking for some more out-of-the-box ideas for your visit, then this is the article for you!

Kawaii Monster Cafe

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Honeymoon Travel Guide: Japan 101

It’s official: Japan is my favourite place on the planet. Gareth and I first visited Tokyo in 2008 for our honeymoon and we’ve always wanted to go back. We haven’t really had the time or money for a (non-working) holiday since then though, but at the beginning of this year we thought “Screw it, we’ve worked our arses off these past few years, let’s just do it!”

Today I wanted to tackle some of your frequently asked questions about our trip. I’ve received so many since I’ve been (over)sharing on Instagram! I’ll be sharing some recommendations of things to see and do in each of the cities we visited over the coming weeks too.

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Our itinerary

The first time we visited, we spent our entire 10 day-trip just in Tokyo. While you can certainly spend more time than that exploring and experiencing this magical city (we still haven’t made it to the Sanrio theme park – TRAVESTY!) Japan is so much more than just its capital.

As we’d been to Tokyo before, and done a lot of the main sites already, we decided to spend just two nights there this time. At first I was worried we wouldn’t get to see enough of it, but we really did manage to pack a lot in. They were long 10+ hour days, but I love being busy and soaking everything in when I travel. The idea of lying on a beach all day sounds so dull to me! Our itinerary went a little something like this:

Thursday 17th March – Arrived in Tokyo
Sunday 20th March – Shinkansen (bullet) train to Kyoto (approx. 2.5 hours)
Friday 26th March – Shinkansen train to Hiroshima (approx. 1.5 hours)
Monday 28th March – Shinkansen train back to Tokyo (approx. 4 hours)
Tuesday 29th March – Flew back to the UK

Osaka is also only a 15 minute journey from Kyoto, so although we hadn’t planned to visit, we did! A lot of my research beforehand told me that Osaka wasn’t that exciting, but I’m so glad we ignored that because we loved it! It was more like Tokyo than Kyoto (which is way more quiet and traditional) but less intense and busy.

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I’m Off to Japan!!

tokyo hello kitty donut1

via Girl Eat World

Kon’nichiwa! It seems like forever since I’ve written a more personal post (there’s just so much weddingness waiting to be shared in my inbox). However I wanted to pop by today and let you all know that I’m off to Japan this week! Gareth and I went there for our honeymoon in 2008, but with hardly any travel experience or money (which, let’s face it, you need in Japan!) so we are super duper excited to be going back with a bit more of both of these crucial things behind us.

We’re heading to Tokyo first, before hopping on the bullet train to Kyoto and finally Hiroshima. Oh goodness, I am so excited! I hope there will be cherry blossoms a-plenty and bountiful kawaii shopping to be had.

I’m away until the end of March, so until then the blog schedule will be a little lighter than usual. Keep popping by though because I have a post scheduled every week day so there will definitely be some things to keep you entertained and inspired in my absence.

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Retro 1960s Wedding with a Moroccan Vibe: Jo & Aki

Jo, a taxidermist, & Aki, a web designer, were married at Byzantium, a quirky bar and restaurant in Bristol. The Moroccan decor added an interesting touch to the celebration. The room was decorated with Moroccan lanterns, pipe cleaner animal and personalised cocktail stirrers. Some friends made them a guest list tree surrounded by candles and glass beads, flowers and fairy lights. Jo made some taxidermy through her company Death & Glory Taxidermy.

“I’m lucky enough to be surrounded by a lot of very talented people”, explained the bride. “It’s very easy to get caught up with the idea of doing everything yourself but if you’ve got people around you that can (and want to) help, then let them! In the end our photographer (Noel was already a professional wedding photographer – handy!), invitation designer, guestbook tree makers, band, ‘priest’ and florist were all friends. It made the whole day much more personal and special and really helped us get the most out of our budget.”

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Married Beneath the Cherry Blossoms: Joseph & Fabiana

Joseph & Fabiana had a low-key and intimate wedding at Brooklyn Botanic Gardens. They decided against an expensive or extravagant wedding, instead favouring a simple and touching ceremony with their nearest and dearest.

The couple met online and discovered a mutual love of photography and travel. After spending years admiring each other’s work through flickr, they finally met in South Korea and ended up travelling to Japan together where they fell in love. The bride wore a multi-coloured dress from Marimekko which set the tone for the day. Fittingly with the Japanese feel (the ceremony was even held on the ‘Japanese Hill’ within the gardens, under the cherry blossoms) she also carried a bouquet made of origami flowers.

“We wanted a non-traditional small wedding that would reflect both of our personalities and be colourful.” the bride wrote. “We originally wanted to get married in Japan, but it was too far away from our home countries (the UK and Mexico) for guests to travel to. Therefore, we searched for Japanese Gardens in closer locations. We found one in the Brooklyn Botanic Gardens which was perfect because New York was a city we had both loved and a location almost half way between the UK and Mexico. We chose April to coincide with the bloom of the cherry blossoms.”

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A Japanese Tea Shop Wedding: Adam & Klara

Adam & Klara had two weddings, the first in Osaka, Japan and the second in Brighton, UK. The Japanese ceremony was held in Kitahama and afterwards the couple and their select few guests headed to Tables in Shinsaibashi, Osaka for tea and cake! When back in the UK, the ceremony took place at Brighton register office and they recreated the tea & cake reception idea with a simple gathering at Metrodeco, a 1930s themed cafe that specialises in high tea.

For both events, the bride and groom wore kimonos which they had made to their specifications, “My kimono was by Misty Waters in Sunderland,” Klara began. “I’ve never felt I was a traditional white dress woman, and nothing really turned me on when I went looking for dresses. When we decided to marry in Japan, kimonos sounded perfect, as Adam loved the idea of wearing something other than a boring suit. We looked into renting kimonos, but it would have cost us about £3,000, and we could only wear them for the day! Also, the whole idea of doing the very traditional Japanese wedding also felt restrictive, and not ‘us’. We have a friend in the UK, Tracey, who makes wedding dresses, and we decided to design our own kimonos. I absolutely love Liberty in London, and can’t get enough of their vintage prints, so I spent weeks choosing perfect clashing liberty prints for my kimono. Adam decided he’d love his Kimono in traditional British tweed. Traditionally, the inside fabric of a kimono is a chance to express the wearers personality, so we both chose fun linings for the inside. I had dainty tea cups, and Adam had vintage slide carousels.”

“The kimonos used yards and yards of fabric and there were quite a few off-cuts,” Klara continued. “Adam brought some with him to Japan and I used them to make fabric necklace/headbands as favours for my bridesmaids. It was lovely and personal for them knowing they were made out of actual bits of kimono fabric. And of course, they were liberty print. I also designed parodies of the Royal wedding tea towels, to go with our British theme, and I drew in Ghibli characters having a British tea party. We screenprinted them onto tea towels and tote bags, and we gave them away as wedding favours to our guests in Japan.”

“As a couple we’ve never really done things in quite the most straightforward way”, Klara answered when I asked why they wanted to marry in Japan. “We were living almost 6000 miles apart when we decided to get married and we only had about 10 weeks to organise everything. Kimono designs, fabric choices and all the logistics had to be decided over Skype. I didn’t see my kimono in the flesh until a few days before the wedding. Right from the start we knew we wanted to do things our own way and make it very much a private affair. Our Japan wedding was just for ‘us’, and our Brighton wedding was for our family and friends. We were married by our friend Tom, who is a western priest in Japan. He adapted a ceremony from Universal Studios Japan, and we swore over Pukka Love Tea. The idea of the ceremony is that if your marriage is really in trouble, either one of you can produce an object; in our case, Love Tea; and you promise to give it another go. We drank Love Tea at our reception in the teahouse, and gave away Love Tea teabags to our guests after.”

“The theme of our wedding ended up being ‘Britishness’ seen through Japanese eyes, and vice versa,” the bride concluded. “I used to live in Japan I was enamored with the tweed, and the Sherlock Holmes style clothes available. I loved how our cultures were seen so differently through each other’s eyes, and it made my own culture fresh and interesting. I loved visiting Japanese tea shops that were so meticulously ‘British’ as they saw it, and they were wonderful places. One in particular had clashing floral tablecloths, amazing china and teaspoons, and the theme began bubbling away from there!”

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Injured Idols: A Fashion Shoot for Irish Designer Claire O’Connor

Happy St Patrick’s Day!

You’re probably going to either love this or hate this. I’m nearing to the side of love because of the freakiness as the fact that this really is something I’ve never seen before in a bridal shoot!

This shoot, set up to promote the new line of wedding dresses by Irish designer Claire O’Connor, reminds me a lot of the Japanese ‘kegadoru’ (injured idols) trend. Girls wear fake bandages and eye patches as fashion accessories, the theory behind it being that it makes them look cute and vulnerable to the opposite sex (only in Japan huh?!)

Claire explains her own ideas behind this shoot, “The inspiration for the Spring/Summer 2012 Bridal campaign hails from our obsession with appearances and looks, and taking that obsession with beauty to the extreme. I love mixing contrasting fabrics and so I have incorporated swarovski crystals and delicate handmade french lace into plaster casts.”

Whatever you think of this, you can’t deny that it’s certainly different…and I looooove different. Pushing the boundaries of the wedding industry complex is something that makes me very exicted indeed!

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An Unconventional Japanese Beach Wedding: Chaco & John

I love Japan. It’s one of my favourite places in the world (we had out honeymoon in Tokyo) and I hope to go back again someday. So when I spied Chaco & John’s wedding at Riviera Zushi Marina in Kamakura and reception at Zushi Beach, I emailed their photographer Chennergy immediately and asked to feature it.

John proposed at the worlds busiest road crossing, right in the middle of Shibuya, Tokyo. Check out the video here – it’s the cutest!

“My inspiration for our wedding theme was my Dad loving Rock n Roll and since both our names are John, or Johnny I thought it would be appropriate to rock to Johnny B Goode,” John explained. “I also am a big fan of the youtube video JK wedding, and the scene in Back to the Future where Michael J Fox rocks out to Johnny B Goode at the prom scene. We also had an 80’s feel, since we both love the 80’s. The 80’s sunglasses and recession song being “Nothing’s Gonna Stop us now” by Starship.”

The shack where their reception was held is only constructed for the summer months, so just like the proposal I guess, the couple had to coordinate and plan the wedding a long time in advance “We booked the venue a year in advance,” John continued. “The floor was sand and was just a great feeling to have a party there.”

“Instead of having a traditional reception, which is a bit costly and boring, we went straight to the after party at the beach. We changed our outfits to a Hawaiian theme. I wore an all white Hawaiian wedding aloha shirt, with a fresh Maile lei brought over by my older brother who lives in Hawaii. I also bought Hawaiian accessories (shark bone necklace) online. Chaco wore a white BCBG lace and a simple leaf and white plumeria flower head lei.”

“Our decorator sewed the table cloths and decorated the tables with herbs and wild flowers, she learned how to create a table setting just for us, because she teaches children for a living and was just a friend who had never done anything like this before. All of our friends pitched in with their skills and talents to make the wedding a reality! We had blues, aquas and yellow wild flowers. Yellow for full of life and blues for tranquil and peaceful ocean. The sea was a big part of our theme since we had our wedding in a glass chapel on the sea, with blue carpet isle lined with seashells.”

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Pheigi & Kiichiro’s Japanese/Scottish Fusion Wedding

Just wow. Like seriously, wow.

That’s pretty much all I said for 5 minutes when Pheigi & Kiichiro’s Japanese/Scottish fusion wedding hit my inbox this week. I almost don’t know where to begin telling their epic wedding story, luckily for me the bride explained it a lot better than I ever could. The couple actually had two weddings – the first in Japan in July 2009 and the second (pictured) in Scotland in September 2010.

“My new Hubby and I actually got married in Japan (where we live) in 2009.  We went to the city office and signed lots of forms to update my alien registration card, change his official address and get hitched.  Which one of those forms was actually my marriage certificate I still don’t know.  I wore my mothers 1970’s full length purple embroidered waistcoat over my purple cord flares and after we went to the crazy Japanese arcade on our street and had photos taken in the hello kitty photo booth.  Much fun yet somewhat lacking in romance.  We thus decided to come home to Scotland and have another celebration with my family, which we did in September.  Planning my wedding from Japan was hard to say the least, especially as I wanted something a little different from the norm, and the whole thing became more of a disappointment as I spent hours trawling through ugly dresses, bland invites and over the top bling, until a good friend with similar problems directed me to your site.  From then on I visited your site nearly every other day to remind myself that there were options other than white wedding package A, B or C and so in turn I am sending you my wedding in hope that it may help other brides in the UK realise the same and give them a wee break from the monotony of the wedding industry.  I hope you like.”

“I came home to Scotland in 2009 to start looking for a wedding venue as I knew that it would be my only chance to see somewhere before I actually returned to get married. I wanted to have a rustic wedding in a barn or something similar but Kiichiro insisted that if he was bringing his family from Japan they were not going to sit in a barn.  He then threw down his one condition, that we get married in a Scottish castle.  Thus my Mother, two of my sisters and myself packed ourselves into a car and went on a road trip from Glasgow through Inverness and up into the highlands visiting every castle on our way.  The castles were GORGEOUS but most were way out of our budget and the ones we could afford were never quite right.  We returned to my sisters house in Ayr two days later more than a little dejected.  My eldest sister then suggested that we go and look at a castle a few miles down the road that I had never heard of so we all, rather grudgingly, got back into the car and drove the few miles to Blairquhan Castle.  As we turned on to the three mile drive my spirits lifted a little.  The river Irvine shaded by huge mossy trees was running alongside the road that was covered in confused pheasants (they obviously weren’t used to cars on their road) and at the end of the road the imposing face of Blairquhan showed itself.  This is no fairytale castle this is a big Scottish “don’t even think of attacking me” castle. Perfect.  Add to this the huge front lawn, boating pond complete with ducks and geese, walled garden and acres and acres of forest and we had the perfect venue.  They had even converted all the old stable buildings into holiday cottages so all my friends and family came for a wee three day break over the wedding weekend.”

Pheigi was decided underwhelmed by traditional wedding dresses so decided to make her perfect gown herself instead. “I went to try on wedding dresses with my best friend imagining we were going to have that movie moment where I would find “the dress” and we would both cry,” she told me. “We did cry…with laughter as I looked friggin’ ridiculous. Most of the dresses were as wide as I am tall making me look like a sequined taffeta square.”

“I am originally from the Isle of Lewis famous for its tweed and I am milliner who works almost exclusively with the lovely fabric so it made sense that my dress too would be woolen.  And so I set about making my brown and green steampunk-esque mermaid, corseted, bustled, leopard print lined wedding gown.  This was the first dress I have ever made and I couldn’t find a pattern I liked so I made it up as I went along.  I am sure a seamstress would have kittens if she looked closely but I was happy with how it turned out and on the wedding day outside in Scotland in September I was very happy to be wrapped up in tweed.  The fabric was woven for me by Callum Maclean of butt of Lewis textiles who was very helpful in offering me tweed and wool samples to make sure I got exactly what I was looking for.”

“My gold Celtic headband was my something old as it was the headband my eldest sister had made for us to wear as her bridesmaids.  I had originally decide that I wanted to wear a top hat but looking around I could find nothing I liked and those willing to make one for me were all very expensive so I decided to make my own.  Instead of a hat I went with an olive green birdcage veil with massive pheasant and peacock feathers which matched the colour of my tweed and my Mother’s outfit perfectly (I also made her a matching hat).  The lack of variety I encountered while searching for my wedding outfit frustrated me so much that I have spent the last year and a half teaching myself millinery and very recently opened a shop on etsy selling my tweed pillbox hats and alternative bridal veils.”

In honour of his wife’s Scottish heritage, Kiichiro wanted to wear a kilt. “Kiichiro decided early on that he wanted to wear a kilt so we sat down with a tartan sample book and to my delight he chose my family tartan (Ancient Macdonald of the Isles muted hunting) with a charcoal tweed waistcoat and jacket to match” continued the Pheigi. “We had the whole outfit made by Philip King in Aberdeen.   My sister Morag knitted his kilt socks.  His Brogues (shoes) came from ebay as did his amazing Tibetan goat sporran.  His plaid brooch was form pewtermill crafts.  His kilt pin was red deer antler as was his sgian dubh both from Comrie Crafts.”

The outdoor ceremony was a very meaningful one. Pheigi explained,  ” I do not belong to an organised faith and my husband is Buddhist, so the choice of Church, registry office or humanist ceremony didn’t really fit. We were already legally married so I decided to write the ceremony myself and my sister Eilidh acted as officiant on the day.  I based the ceremony on the Celtic Scottish tradition of hand fasting so we got married under a HUGE tree with our family and friends standing in a circle around us.  Instead of bridesmaids I had my 4 corners to represent the elements, my best friend and nephew read poems, my uncle gave us a blessing in Gaelic (my family’s mother tongue), my Aunt (married over 40 years) welcomed us to married life and held the broomstick for us to jump over and enter married life before we welcomed our guests with a dram from our wedding quaich. After the wedding we surprised our guests with a band of hairy drummers who led them from our tree to the walled garden of the castle where we played games and ate canapés while drinking sparkly on picnic blankets.  As it was cold I had set up a tea bar offering herbal and Japanese tea for people to keep warm.  We had a sit down meal in the castle where myself, my mother, the groom and the best man (who doesn’t speak English) gave speeches.  Our first dance was a swing dance to Hey sailor by the Detroit Cobras.  My friend officially opened the bar by reading a poem about the SS politician (the whisky filled boat that sank off the coast of Bara and led to the film Whisky galore).  We had a traditional Scottish Ceilidh then played with sky lanterns and sparklers.”

To keep thing personal, the couple wanted to DIY a lot of their reception details. “I did so much by myself and on the day it was a little heart breaking to see that most people don’t notice all the tiny details that you put in.  I noticed them however and it made my day better,” the bride continued. “Doing everything by yourself is hard work and can be really stressful.  The night before the wedding as I was trying to cover seats, make flowers, arrange tables and welcome my guests the word fun was far, far away. However my favorite memory of the day was a DIY moment.  At 6am on the morning of the wedding Kiichiro came and woke me up to go and decorate our wedding tree.  This tree was on a small lawn through a little piece of forest.  The branches were huge and came all the way down to sweep the floor making it feel like you were standing under a huge leafy umbrella.  It was so big that all our 80 guests could happily stand in a circle and still be enclosed in our green bubble.  We decorated it with ribbons, origami cranes on thread and candles hanging in jam jars.  At 6am as the mist was starting to lift off the grass and the sun was so low in the sky you had to squint I remember standing under my massive tree, ribbon in hand, and watching the sleepy faces of my sisters and mother wander out of the forest to help us.”

Finally, the bride summed up to me why their wedding was perfect for them. “I didn’t choose to have a different wedding.  I don’t want to be different for the sake of being different.  I just didn’t like any of the wedding stuff that was out there.  I found the whole wedding process to be disappointing and frustrating as I flipped through wedding magazines and websites and found absolutely nothing I liked.  The few things I did find I couldn’t afford.  It broke my heart.  Not for one second did I consider the white wedding just for ease.  In one way I had it very easy.  My family was awesome.  No one questioned any of my decisions.  No one made negative comments and during the day no one person (within my earshot) asked “what the f**k is going on?”.  Without their help there wouldn’t have been a wedding.”

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Pheigi & Kiichiro’s Japanese/Scottish Fusion Wedding

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Just wow. Like seriously, wow. That's pretty much all I said for 5 minutes when Pheigi & Kiichiro's Japanese/Scottish fusion wedding hit my inbox this week. I almost don't know where to begin telling their epic wedding story, luckily for me the bride explained it a lot better than I ever could. The couple actually had two weddings - the first in Japan in July 2009 and the second (pictured) in Scotland in September 2010. "My new Hubby and I actually got married in Japan (where we live) in 2009. We went to the city office and signed lots of forms to update my alien registration card, change his official address and get hitched. Which one of those forms was actually my marriage certificate I still don't know. I wore my mothers 1970's full length purple embroidered waistcoat over my purple cord flares and after we went to the crazy Japanese arcade on our street and had photos taken in the hello kitty photo booth. Much fun yet somewhat lacking in romance. We thus decided to come home to Scotland and have another celebration with my family, which we did in September. Planning my wedding from Japan was hard to say the least, especially as I wanted something a little different from the norm, and the whole thing became more of a disappointment as I spent hours trawling through ugly dresses, bland invites and over the top bling, until a good friend with similar problems directed me to your site. From then on I visited your site nearly every other day to remind myself that there were options other than white wedding package A, B or C and so in turn I am sending you my wedding in hope that it may help other brides in the UK realise the same and give them a wee break from the monotony of the wedding industry. I hope you like."

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Geeky, Gorgeous Wedding

And I mean geeky in the BEST way possible! I am a huge geek fan (and I even married one myself) Emma & Daniel had their very own geek fest wedding incorporating everything they love – gadgets, games, Japanese culture…and CAKE (seriously this sounds like my husbands dream wedding!)

R&RBride_E&D26

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