A Maryland Farm Wedding: Jamie & McKenzie

This wedding is just too gorgeous for words…like literally. I just stared and stared at these amazing photos for (what seemed like) hours before I found the words to start writing this article. There really is something utterly breathtaking about this wedding and Lydia Jane‘s images that captured it. I’m thrilled to be able to share it with you today so please forgive my gushing…

Jamie & McKenzie were married at home. They love their lifestyle on their farm, living alongside the sheep and chickens, so a homespun wedding was really the only option. The couple have a hugely supportive family who all helped out to make the wedding happen.

“Initially our wedding budget was non-existent. Jamie had just broken his arm, had surgery with no insurance, was out of work, and I was supporting the both of us”, McKenzie told me. “Our families pulled together to make our wedding a completely different ‘animal’ than we’d initially imagined. We were going to do a modified potluck, put together a bunch of small 12×12 tents, clean out the garage and open the house up to guests if it was raining, pick our own wildflowers, etc. I think combined, our families spent about $6,000 on us. I’m not completely sure but I’ll be honest, this is a sore spot for us because $6,000 is an incredible amount of money and it’s challenging to say no to people who really just want your wedding to be beautiful and ‘normal’ and non-farmy and accessible to older relatives. We eventually gave up a lot of our original ideas because we realized that if our families were going to help us, we’d have to be flexible with our values (local food vs. Costco, etc.) It sounds like I’m complaining, but really it’s just out of concern for what people can really afford and a strong dislike for harmful consumerism. Spending even $100 to us is a BIG deal. We’re trying to start a farm and thinking about that money going towards one-day’s worth of non-local baby carrots was a little unnerving (I don’t actually know how much money was spent on carrots, I’m just saying…) Overall, it was a beautiful day, and everyone worked their butts off to make it so. We are lucky that our families care about us enough to wrangle sheep, brave potential poison ivy patches, build new stairways, and let go our non-traditional trash set-up. This was where the money spent on non-local food became okay in our eyes. We divided the set-up into recycling, trash, and chicken-scraps. After dinner, our guests scraped their own plates in a homemade ‘mess hall’ and were overall pretty respectful of us wanting to feed the food scraps to our chickens. Our chickens ate like royalty for the next few days!”

The bride wore a vintage dress that her Grandmother had found at an antique’s auction. It fit her perfected and needed no alternations, “I feel like it was definitely meant to be” McKenzie smiled. She wore $30 Kohl sandals and a white dahlia flower crown. Her bridesmaid’s picked their own dresses, “The girls picked them out with the guideline that they needed to be middle-waisted, garden party length, and in the pale blue or green color spectrum. At first I gave them those guidelines but it was challenging because they didn’t have any visuals to go