Tag Archives: queer

Intimate, Queer, Trans Wedding with Alternative Flair

Luna and Omari wanted to disrupt stereotypical wedding gender norms and make their October wedding day feel as queer, trans and authentic as possible, all while keeping their alternative flair. “We originally were planning a huge wedding but did not have enough money to do so,” Luna told us. “Being the ambitious people that we are, we decided to do a last-minute small wedding ceremony at Prospect Park and a few days before we booked a venue through Peerspace for a reception.”

Everything about their day was DIY and collaboration with their friends and family, from their florals to their reception food. “Everyone bought their own drinks and showed up dressed as their best selves.” The couple spent around $4,000 on their day, with their most expensive elements being their outfits.

Omari told us, “We were very fortunate to have my former tattoo shop where I was apprenticing at the time pay for all of the alcohol and food at the reception.”

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Celestial Inspired Scottish Elopement

Inspired by their love of stargazing, science, geekery and our awesome universe, Emily and Alex’s Friday 13th elopement was their dream party and gave them the chance to wear and be surrounded by the things they find most beautiful in the world. The couple told us; “Our styling was inspired by Alasdair Gray’s zodiac night sky mural on the ceiling at the venue we chose, Òran Mór, which is the largest piece of public art in Scotland.”

As well as choosing Glasgow for sentimental reasons, Emily and Alex wouldn’t have been able to have the ceremony that reflected them in England. “Scotland allowed us to have a Humanist ceremony, and Scottish vows don’t require you to refer to your new spouse as a wife/husband or any aspect of traditional marital roles. This was really important for us as an equal partnership and queer couple, with one of us being non-binary. In a Scottish wedding, there are no ‘legally prescribed form of words’ (i.e. required vows) other than “I take you [name] in marriage” which meant that we could keep our ceremony short, simple, and focused on affirming our relationship as it really is.”

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