Category Archives: DIY Tutorials

DIY Tutorial: Cameo Necklace

I may be biased but this cameo necklace DIY Tutorial from Cat Morley of crafty community Cut Out + Keep  may be my favourite ever! If you’re of a crafty persuasion and fancy making some personalised wedding jewellery or gifts (how cute would these be for bridemaids?) then you’re going to get very excited indeed about this one…

Of course you don’t have to make your necklace of me (!) or with my logo but I’m sure this tutorial will inspire you to come up with your own designs. You could maybe put each bridesmaid’s name in place of the Rock n Roll Bride logo?

This tutorial looks like it might be complicated when you see how polished the final result is, but honestly I was shocked at how simple (and genius!) it is. All you need is a little shrink plastic (remember that!?)

Supplies Needed:

♥ Shrink plastic in a variety of colours
♥ Glitter glue
♥ Jewellery chain (can be bought from craft stores like hobbycraft or fabric shops)
♥ A clasp (again should be easy to find in craft or fabric stores)
♥ 1 large and 2 small jump rings
♥ 2 eye pins
♥ 2 small black beads
♥ Beaded Trim
♥ Small crystals
♥ Strong adhesive
♥ Wire cutters
♥ Jewellery pliers
♥ Tweezers
♥ Scissors
♥ Xacto knife
♥ Paper (for template)

Method:

Step One: Start with a portrait photo and trace around the silhouette on to paper. Make separate templates for the head, hair and the jewellery. Remember you’re template should be 7x bigger than you want your finished template to be.

Step Two: Cut out your templates and layer on top of each other. Create an oval template for your silhouette to sit on and then make a second slightly larger and third even larger oval template. Line up the two largest ovals and punch a hole through the top of both.

Step Three: Draw around the templates on to various colours of shrink plastic. When working with clear shrink plastic, use blue-tack to stick the template to the plastic and cut around it.

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DIY Tutorial: Photo Booth Chalkboard Speech Bubbles

Hello Kat & Rock n Roll Bride readers, I’m Rebecca Douglas of www.rebeccadouglas.co.uk a Kent based wedding and lifestyle photographer who loves working with people and making and creating beautiful things!  When I’m not shooting and doing photography related stuff I love to get a make on with all sorts of materials.

I really loved the images that I was seeing from wedding photo booths and so wanted to develop these blackboard speech bubbles for guests to write messages on while in photo booths at weddings.

Supplies Needed:

♥ 3mm thick MDF
♥ Chalkboard Spray Paint  (I bought mine from amazon but you should be able to get it in craft stores or places like B&Q too)
♥ Chalk board pens (as above)
♥ A laser cutter or jigsaw
♥ Sandpaper

Method:

Step One: Cut the MDF into the shapes you want the speech bubbles to be. You’ll find there are a lot of sellers on eBay that already sell pre-cut shapes if you don’t have a laser cutter or jigsaw yourself. I’ve had a google around and there are also a lot of companies that offer laser cutting online, where you just email in your order and voila, the cut shapes are sent to you. That said a bit of elbow grease with a jigsaw and sandpaper will do the trick too.

Step Two: Set out a wide area of newspaper and lay the cut shapes out. Before you start spraying, make sure you have a big border of newspaper, or you’ll be left with a newspaper shaped outline on your garden path like mine is now sporting! (Whoooops!) When you start spraying, be sure to keep a consistent movement across the shapes as you don’t want paint to build up in one area (this will show up in photos). The can recommends that you spray at a height of 30cm from the surface which gives a good even coverage.

Step Three: Leave the shapes to dry for around 20 minutes. I used this time constructively and had a cup of Yorkshire brew and a few obligatory custard creams.

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DIY Tutorial: Yummy & Easy Peanut Butter Cups Recipe

Hi! My name is Natty. I love making things, baking things and if I am honest, eating things. I turned my passion for design, craft and cooking into creating beautiful bespoke dessert tables. I love seeing the reaction from couples who see their table for the first time, it never gets old.

Today I wanted to share with the readers of Rock n Roll Bride one of my favourite treats. I think they’d make great homemade wedding favours!

Supplies Needed:

♥ Cup measures
♥ A couple of bowls
♥ A spoon
♥ Silicone cases or mini cupcake cases.
♥ Microwave

Ingredients:

♥ 1 cup of Peanut butter smooth or crunchy depends on your preference
♥ 1/2 Cup of icing sugar
♥ 1/2 Teaspoon of Salt
♥ 400grams Chocolate. Milk, Dark or white. ( I use a mixture of white and milk for a sweeter taste that’s not too chocolatey)
♥ Sprinkles/ decorations.

Makes around 36, depending on how many you devour in the process.

Method:

Step 1: Measure out all your ingredients, sampling some chocolate if you desire.

Step 2: In a bowl mix 1/2 a cup of peanut butter with the icing sugar and salt until well combined.

Step 3: In the other bowl, place your white chocolate and remaining peanut butter in the microwave until melted. Keep checking every 30 seconds or so as you do not want it to burn.

Step 4: Add the milk chocolate, stir and microwave again, until all chocolate has melted.

Step 5: Take your moulds/mini cupcake cases and fill the bottoms with a covering of your mixture. Set to one side.

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DIY Tutorial: Origami Animals {Part Two}

If you missed part one, check out how to make your origami animals. You can also see all these ideas in action in Ceri & Terry’s origami themed wedding.

Again, over to you Ceri!

Having gotten ourselves in a folding mood with the 1,000 cranes (plus a few – we ended up folding more than we needed!), as the wedding approached, we decided to branch out – we folded tiny cranes for the place cards (beautiful, but very fiddly) and decided that, instead of having whisky distilleries or singers as our table names, we would look up exciting models for origami animals and fold those for the centrepieces. As we didn’t really want flowers, but still wanted our tables to look nice, this seemed like a perfect solution. Finally, a couple of weeks before the wedding, I decided that I did want a bouquet, but that I would fold it in order to stay in keeping with the origami theme. I was a bit nervous about it, though – but I figured that if it looked a mess, I didn’t have to use it! In the end, my bouquet of blue and yellow lilies came out even better than I’d hoped, and remains a lovely memento of the day for me.

Supplies Needed:

♥ For the centrepieces we used terracotta flowerpots filled with Loveheart sweets, to stand up the animals. We decorated each pot with a bit of white ribbon, and used a piece of thin dowel (or you could use a chopstick), to which we fixed the origami piece. We used lots of hot glue from a glue gun and blue tack to steady the dowel
♥ For the streamers you need simply need the cranes, a glue gun and some ribbon.

Flowerpot Centrepieces

Step One: Wrap the ribbon around the top, cut to size, and use a glue-gun to fix in place. We glued a small crane on top of the join to cover it.

DIY Tutorial: Origami Animals {Part One}

I’ve got something a little different in terms of a DIY tutorial today. Ceri & Terry’s origami themed wedding was so popular (in fact so much so that I think a national wedding magazine picked it up afterwards as well!) when I blogged it that I asked Ceri if she wouldn’t mind sharing some of origami tips and ideas with us.

She’s gone above and beyond what I expected of her and has not only put together some basic origami tips but has created three individual animal tutorials plus two extra tutorials of ways to encorperate your creatures into your wedding day (to be posted later today).

Are you ready for this?!

I’ve always liked doing little crafty things, but prefer the kind of project that I can just pick up when I want to make something – so origami was perfect as it’s easy to learn the basic techniques, and there’s not much investment in start-up materials! Over the last fifteen years, I’ve gone through “origami phases” where the house ends up littered with various origami creatures. I’m also a bit of a romantic, so when I read about the senbazuru (a group of 1,000 paper cranes, traditionally made as a wedding gift in Japan and said to grant the couple one thousand years of happiness and prosperity) I thought it was a beautiful idea. When my fiancé and I were discussing how to decorate the venue for our wedding, it was the idea that we liked the best. We weren’t sure how long it would take, though!

In the end, it took us about three months of folding a few cranes each in the evenings. Part of the reason that the senbazuru is sometimes folded by the bride and groom together is that it is supposed to prepare them for married life, and I started to understand this as we began the mammoth task of filling a cardboard box with our colourful creations – it was a serious undertaking. However, it also gave us a chance to sit together and talk, and to create something together that, in the end, we were really proud of.

In this tutorial, the folds are for the crane, the lily and one of our animals (the frog, folded from the same base as the lily), and I’ll go through how we put these together into our decorations.

Supplies Needed:

♥ Different coloured paper – in a perfect square (cut this yourself) wrapping paper is great or you can buy special origami paper from stationers

The Crane:

click image to enlarge

I’m using a double-sided piece of paper for all the folds. In this case, it’s blue on one side and purple on the other. I want the finished crane to be blue, so I’m starting with the blue side face down, and the purple “inside” upwards.

Step One: Fold the paper corner to corner, so that you have a triangle. Then fold this triangle corner to corner. You then have a triangular object, with two pockets inside.

Step Two: Open up each of these pockets and squash-fold them down, so that you have a diamond shape that’s open at the bottom.
Each of the side corners will have two layers, one at the front and one at the back.

Step Three: Keeping the open end towards you, fold each of the side corners (from the top layer only) into the middle, so that the lower edge rests against the centre line of the model (it will look like a kite). Turn the model over and do the same on the other side. Fold the top point down over these folds, front and back, so that you create a new fold. Then unfold the flaps that you’ve made – the next fold will be done along these creases.

Step Four: This is the only tricky bit – you do what is called a “petal fold”. You now have the open-ended diamond in front of you, like in step 2, with some additional creases. Pick up the bottom point (only the very top layer), and gently lift it upwards, folding along the creases that you’ve just made, including the horizontal crease at the top. The flaps fold into the middle. This is the crane’s wing. Do the same on the other side. You should now have a long, pointy diamond, where one end (the end pointing towards you) has two “legs” – that’s how I think of it, and if you look at it from the side, you should be able to see the wings and the body between them

Step Five: Now we want to narrow the lower part to make the neck and tail. Fold the side corners into the middle again, so that the edges lie along the centre line of the model. Do this on both sides. You now have a pointy diamond with two legs, but where the bottom is narrower than the top.

Step Six: Fold each “leg” (these are the head and tail) up at the angle you want them to be in relation to the wings, and make sure that the crease is reasonably pronounced, and then unfold. Now fold them up at the same angle, but between the wings (this is called an “inside reverse fold”) – the fold in the middle of the neck/tail will reverse. If your paper is a bit thick, you might find that your paper is difficult to fold here, and overlaps too much for you to be able to make the fold look neat. If this happens to me, I go back a couple of steps and rearrange the folds at step 5 to give a little more room.

Step Seven: Almost done – you now have everything except the head. Chose one of the head/tail ends, and make a small “inside reverse” fold to make the head. Now fold the wings down.You can blow gently into the hole at the bottom of the model to inflate the body, or arrange the model so that it will stand up by itself – or you could make it into a decoration.

The Flower & Frog (base)

Again, I’m starting with the colour I want my piece to be face down. In this model, the “inside” colour will show in the middle of the flower, so double sided paper looks great. The flower and the frog start from the same base.

click image to enlarge

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DIY Tutorial: 1920s Style Cap Veil

After the popularity of the rainbow petticoat tutorial that Alexandra King created for Rock n Roll Bride, I was keen to get her to design us something else just as special. We came up with the idea of making your own 1920s cap style veil. Wedding veils can be sooo expensive so we thought having a DIY option would be a great idea! I really hope you like it. I LOVE it.

Over to you Alex…

This cap style veil is inspired by the gorgeous twenties flapper veils and in this DIY tutorial you’ll create something that, even if matched with a simple dress, will make a grand entrance. This is a lovely project to work on with your friends and/or family over time, you can embroider messages on the hem and use details that have been collected or personal to you. I imagine it being passed on to another bride, adding more detail with each wedding.

All of the trimmings for this veil were found in a local haberdashery with some vintage lace sourced from a charity shop and the veiling can be bought easily online. The material costs can be from as little as £40 and upwards depending on your base fabric.

Supplies Needed:

♥ Tulle (this can be found cheaply online. To create a cathedral length veil like I have, you will need 3×3 metres. You can use a nylon tulle, cotton tulle or silk tulle. The natural fibres have a better drape but need extra care.)
♥ A sewing machine
♥ Needle and thread
♥ Embellishments of your choice – you can use corsages, lace, bows, ribbon, rhinestones, studs anything you like.

Method:

Step One: Edge your veil in a lace or satin trim. You can go as fine or as wide as you like depending on the look you want. I used a 15mm guipure lace trim.

Step Two: Check the veil is hanging properly all around. You may want to curve your corners or leave them sharp depending on how you like the veil to fold.

Step Three: Measure over the top of your head from ear to ear and mark on the centre edge of the veil. This is where you will place your veil and where the decoration will be.

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